Gold-Standard Dentistry

A keystone of health for dogs and cats.

Dental Food

Veterinary specific food can be added to your pet’s diet to help remove tartar from the back chewing teeth. Click here to view options for Royal Canin. +

Water Additives

There are products that can be added to your pet’s water in order to help reduce plaque bacteria. Visit our Online Store. +

Dental Before & After

We take oral health very seriously at both of our locations. Look through our Before & After examples of a Dental Cleaning! +

Before The Dental Cleaning

Drop off time is usually between 7:30-8:30 am, before our clinic opens. Just ring the doorbell when you arrive and we will meet you and welcome your pet inside. We will confirm your paperwork, weigh your pet, and ask you some questions. Plan for about 20 minutes to go through this process.

The Veterinarian will perform a physical exam the morning of surgery and will call you to discuss the physical exam and answer any questions you still have about the day. We will also call you after the procedure is over to let you know how it went and when you can be reunited with them.

During The Dental Cleaning

Anesthetic

Your pet will have a tailored anesthetic protocol and will be monitored by a registered veterinary technologist. They will receive IV fluids, hospitalization for the day, post-operative monitoring, pain medication given at the time of the procedure as well as some to go home, local blocks of the surgery site where appropriate, and lots of love from our team.

Dental Cleaning

This is the process of making your pet’s teeth pearly white again. The most important thing is to clean under the gum line which cannot be done while the pet is awake. The teeth are cleaned with an ultrasonic scaler and polished. They are also charted (an in-depth examination) to identify any potential problem teeth or missing teeth.

Dental Radiographs

X-rays are taken of the full mouth to determine if there are any teeth that are concerning or might require extractions. Just like in humans, half of your pet’s tooth is hidden under the gum line and can only be examined by x-rays.

Dental Surgery

If any teeth need to be extracted, local blocks will be done on the surgery site. These blocks are meant to freeze the area where we are doing oral surgery to ensure a better anesthetic and a more comfortable recovery. Once the site is frozen, oral surgery is performed to remove diseased or fractured teeth.

Dental Care FAQs

Dental surgery is the removal of diseased teeth from the mouth through proper surgical techniques. In advanced stages of dental disease, we need to extract the affected teeth. It involves similar techniques as the soft tissue surgery but also involves the bones and teeth. We really focus on management of pain and stress at all levels. For example, even though your pet is sleeping peacefully under anesthetic, we still put in dental freezing! We are always cleaning the remaining teeth with the hope that we can help slow the development of plaque and tarter in the future. We find owners report that their pet is acting like a puppy or a kitten again after we remove the teeth that were previously causing them pain.

The research is that the plaque bacteria under the gumline is truly the cause of dental disease in our pets. A non-anesthetic based cleaning does not allow a proper cleaning under the gumline. It also does not allow dental radiographs which lets us see under the gumline which is where half of the tooth structure lives and often where most of our pet’s disease also is. Without x-rays it goes undetected. The standard of care for all pets undergoing a dental procedure is full mouth x-rays.

Dental Care FAQs

Dental surgery is the removal of diseased teeth from the mouth through proper surgical techniques. In advanced stages of dental disease, we need to extract the affected teeth. It involves similar techniques as the soft tissue surgery but also involves the bones and teeth. We really focus on management of pain and stress at all levels. For example, even though your pet is sleeping peacefully under anesthetic, we still put in dental freezing! We are always cleaning the remaining teeth with the hope that we can help slow the development of plaque and tarter in the future. We find owners report that their pet is acting like a puppy or a kitten again after we remove the teeth that were previously causing them pain.

The research is that the plaque bacteria under the gumline is truly the cause of dental disease in our pets. A non-anesthetic based cleaning does not allow a proper cleaning under the gumline. It also does not allow dental radiographs which lets us see under the gumline which is where half of the tooth structure lives and often where most of our pet’s disease also is. Without x-rays it goes undetected. The standard of care for all pets undergoing a dental procedure is full mouth x-rays.